Gold (XAUUSD) Up $11.79 Over Past 4 Hours, Started Today Up 0.59%; Price Base in Formation Over Past 90 Days

Gold 4 Hour Price Update

Updated November 13, 2020 01:56 AM GMT (09:56 PM EST)

1876.5 was the closing price of the four-hour candle for Gold, resulting in the current 4 hour candle being one in which price moved up 0.63% ($11.79) from the previous 4 hours. Relative to other instruments in the metals asset class, Gold ranked 3rd since the previous 4 hours in terms of percentage price change.

Gold Daily Price Recap

The choppiness in the recent daily price action of Gold continues; to start today, it came in at a price of 1875.75659 US dollars, up 0.59% ($11.05) since the previous day. Relative to other instruments in the metals asset class, Gold ranked 3rd since the previous day in terms of percentage price change. The daily price chart of Gold below illustrates.

XAUUSD

Gold Technical Analysis

Also of note is that on a 90 day basis price appears to be forming a base — which could the stage for it being a support/resistance level going forward. For additional context, note that price has gone up 7 out of the past 10 days.

Overheard on Twitter

Over on Twitter, here were the top tweets about Gold:

  • From wisdomswindon:

    @SLowie100 @power_thompson don’t forget #CEY has zero debt so no pressure whatsoever on the balance sheet from temporary bad numbers. even using 1300 aisc & 1800-1850 gold price, the 9p annual dividend is fully covered by FCF.
    If chairman wants SP to rise (he just bought a chunk at 151p) he keeps 9p divi.

  • From iraDaisuke:

    @Nafisafishi What my brother told me gold price naik bila economic not stable. So bila ada vaccine ni so looking forward nnt stable balik hence price jatuh. That’s why normally usd naik (good economy) gold price turun if usd turun (economy unstable) gold price naik. Normally benchmark usd 😅

  • From DavidDeutschOxf:

    @james_barton Emergencies like wars and pandemics suddenly change the relationships between e.g. real wealth and its usual proxies. It’s surely a mistake to call this change a change in wealth.Would be even worse than calling inflation, or a change in the gold price, a change in wealth.